Behind The Scenes: Homesteading With Chronic Illness

Behind The Scenes: Homesteading With Chronic Illness
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Homesteading With Chronic Illness

Homesteading as a healthy person is a task. Homesteading with chronic illness is hard to the nth degree. It’s not impossible, but it does create some interesting problems. I personally have¬†Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome¬†type 3. This means I have hyper-mobility in my joints, which cause a lot of issues. The picture to the left shows my thumb folded to my wrist, which is the most obvious and least painful example of hyper-mobility for me. I have regular dislocations, subluxations, scoliosis, and chronic joint pain, among other things. I’ve even dislocated joints in my sleep before! As you can imagine, this causes some serious issues with homesteading. There’s a limit to how much weight I can lift and what tasks I can do. And I can forget about any tasks that require odd positions or contortions. There are so many homestead chores that I just can’t take on, or can only do in a limited capacity. Even things like holding my daughter too long or wearing a heavy back pack can pull my shoulders painfully. Added to all that is the fatigue brought on by chronic pain. I manage, but only with a lot of help and support from my husband!

Read on for more stories from homesteaders with chronic illness who are still living their dreams:

Autumn Rose at Hope For Better Living: Chronic illness complicates every aspect of living, and particularly, my homesteading activities! Since battling Lyme disease I’ve had to relearn HOW to do life as a fatigued individual. In order to accomplish tasks, I must plan far in advance, gauge energy levels (when it runs out, its OUT), and be sure to organize my day, beginning with the important things first. Though it isn’t easy, it isn’t all bad! In fact, because of limitations, I have found more efficient ways to do things. Number one on the list is asking for help, whether a spouse, friend or family member, life is easier when working together! I’ve also come to recognize there’s no shame in using a timer on the garden sprinkler, that mulching methods are awesome and a few weeds don’t hurt, that its ok to have our birds on a system where they are set up for 2 weeks+ and need checking only every couple days. Though it isn’t the ideal, it makes it all possible! The key is in letting go of expectations you put on or allow others to put on yourself. Do what you can and be proud of it!

https://www.reddit.com/r/bipolar/comments/3x5i91/this_a_normal_brain_and_a_bipolar_brain_its_real/Anonymous on homesteading with Bipolar Disorder:

Having Bipolar Disorder changes everything about homesteading. From finding things joyful one day to being completely apathetic about them the next, the emotional roller coaster finds ways to upset everyday tasks. Right now I’m not on any medication due to some awful side effects, so I am learning to manage on my own. This means pushing through debilitating depression to make sure animals are fed and watered, even if I can’t manage finding the energy to brush my own teeth. It also means fighting to finish a single project during manic stages, rather than starting 15 things and not completing any. I am constantly at war with myself, either feeling over or under whelmed with my daily life. That said, I love the life I live and I will always find a way to make it work, no matter how I’m feeling!

Homesteading with chronic illness’s is a challenge, but it is not impossible!

Have your own story about homesteading with a chronic illness? Add it in the comments, or email me at katie@sleddogslow.com to have it added here!

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